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If you would like to join Boy Scout Troop 189 visit one of our meetings at the Allison United Methodist Church located on Morland Ave on the Dickinson College Campus. We meet every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Church Basement, Fellowship Hall.

 

New Parent Information

 

 

Boy Scouts of America

Keystone Area Council

 

 

Boy Scout Troop 189

 

Parent Guide

March 1998

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTION

Welcome!

What Is It All About?

Scouting Is Simple

Aims Of Scouting

Scout Oath, Law, Motto & Slogan

Methods Of Scouting

Background

CHAPTER II.
TROOP ORGANIZATION

Troop 189 Organization Chart

CHAPTER III.
THE SCOUT UNIFORM

CHAPTER IV.
ADVANCEMENT

First Class To Eagle

Advancement Process

Merit Badges

Board Of Review

Court Of Honor

CHAPTER V.
OUTDOOR PROGRAM

CHAPTER VI.
YOUTH PROTECTION

Program Summary

Parent Information

Troop Adults

CHAPTER VII.
THE MONEY

Scout Expenses

Troop Expenses

Fund Raising

Scout Accounts

CHAPTER VIII.
INFORMATION AND FEEDBACK

Troop Newsletters

Troop Website

Parent Comments

CHAPTER IX.
CLOSING REMARKS

INFORMATION SHEET

Note: This booklet was complied with the use of text from a variety of scouting publications and other resources. Therefore the material contained is not necessarily the work of the author and it is not the intention to represent it as such.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome!

Welcome to the Boy Scouts of America and Troop 189! By becoming a parent of a Boy Scout, not only will your son be having fun, you will to. As a parent you have the privilege to watch your son grow from a boy to a man. As a Boy Scout Parent you have the privilege to watch you son grows from a Scout into an Eagle Scout. This is a tremendously important and rewarding endeavor that you can share with him. Be sure to pay close attention because the time will go by fast!

Boy Scout Troop 189 is part of the Kittatinny District of the Keystone Area Council. Troop 189 was chartered in 195? by Allison United Methodist Church. Many scouts and scouters have enjoyed the scouting program with the troop, which is apparent in its success. We hope you and your son will enjoy scouting as much as everyone else has. What is Scouting all about? What will I be expected to do? What does Scouting cost? We have prepared this booklet to answer these questions and hopefully any other questions you may have. Please, do not be overwhelmed by this booklet. It contains a lot of information that is intended to help you understand Boy Scout Troop 189.

"Scouting is not an abstruse or difficult science: rather it is a jolly game if you take it in the right light. At the same time it is educative, and (like Mercy) it is apt to benefit him that giveth as well as him that receiveth."

- Lord Baden Powell of Gilwell

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What Is It All About?

 

Scouting Is Simple

To an outsider Scouting must at first sight appear to be a very complex matter, and many parents are probably put off from becoming involved because of the enormous number and variety of things that they think they would have to know in order to be active with the boys. But it need not be so, if as a parent you will only realize the following points:

1. The aim of Scouting is quite a simple one.

2. The Scoutmaster gives to the boy the ambition and desire to learn for himself by suggesting to him activities that attract him, and he pursues till he, by experience, does them aright. (Such activities are suggested in the Scout Handbook).

3. The Scoutmaster works through his Patrol Leaders.

 

Aims Of Scouting

The aim of the Scout training is to improve the standard of our future citizenhood, especially in Character and Health; to replace Self with Service, to make the lads individually efficient, orally and physically, with the object of using that efficiency for service for their fellow-men. Citizenship has been defined briefly as "active loyalty to

the community." In a free country it is easy, and not unusual, to consider oneself a good citizen by being a law-abiding man, doing your work and expressing your choice in politics, sports, or activities, "leaving it to George" to worry about the nation's welfare. This is passive citizenship. But passive citizenship is not enough to uphold in the world the virtues of freedom, justice, and honor. Only active citizenship will do. The three aims to scouting:

Aim I -- Growth in Moral strength and Character

Aim II -- Participating Citizenship

Aim III -- Development of Physical, Mental, and Emotional Fitness

 

 

Scout Oath, Law, Motto & Slogan

The values that Scouting strives to instill is based in the Scout Oath, Law, Motto and Slogan.

The Scout Oath:

On my honor I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

 

 

 

 

The Scout Law:

A Scout is:

Trustworthy

Loyal

Helpful

Friendly

Courteous

 

Kind

Obedient

Cheerful

Thrifty

Brave

Clean

Reverent

 

Scout Motto

Scout Slogan

Be Prepared

Do a Good Turn Daily

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Methods Of Scouting

Ideals- The Ideals of Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, Law, Motto and Slogan. The Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what he becomes.

Patrols- The patrol method gives Scouts an experience in group living and participating in citizenship. It places a certain amount of responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to act in small groups where they can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through their elected leaders.

Outdoors- Boy Scouting is designed to take place in the outdoors. It is in the outdoors that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with each other. It is here where the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive. More is discussed about the outdoor program later in this guide.

Advancement- Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps to over come through the advancement process. The Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he overcomes each challenge. More is discussed about Advancement later in this guide.

Adult Association- Boys learn from the examples set by their adult leaders. Troop leadership may be male or female and association with adults of high character is encouraged at this stage in a young man's development.

Personal Growth- As Scouts plan their activity, and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The good turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do good turns for others.

Leadership Development- Boy Scouting encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership roles of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

Uniform- The uniform makes the Scout troop visible as a force of good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Scout's commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Scout identity in a world brotherhood youth who believe in the same ideals. More is discussed about the uniform later in this guide.

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Background

Since 1910, these principles have been taught in an atmosphere of recreation and fun which allows young people to develop self confidence, leadership and moral character. More and more men, trained as Scouts, are taking their places in today's world as responsible adult leaders. Men who earned badges as Scouts, sit on the Supreme Court and in the chambers of Congress. Others hold important offices in our government, business and industry. Most of the members of congress were Scouts, as well as most of the astronauts who have walked on the moon.

The Boy Scouts of America is the largest youth oriented organization in the United States. More than 4 million boys and leaders are currently registered in the Boy Scouts of America.

Unlike Cub Scouting, which many of you are familiar with, Boy Scouting is a youth-lead organization. The boys learn how to organize and lead the Troop. After training, and with supervision from the adult leaders, the boys run the show.

The boys in the Troop will be working towards their 1st class and then Eagle ranks. As they travel on their trail to Eagle they will not only learn how to lead a team to a goal, but they will actually lead teams of scouts in a number of situations.

Please take a few minutes to read Chapter 1 of your son's Boy Scout Handbook.

 

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CHAPTER II.

TROOP ORGANIZATION

 

Troop 189 is a part of the Kittatinny District of the Keystone Area Council, Boy Scouts of America. The Troop's organization consists of a Chartered Organization, a Troop Committee, the Troop, and the Troop's Parents. The Chartered Organization for Troop 189 is Allison United Methodist Church. They provide a meeting place for the troop and other support. The Troop Committee meets on the fourth Tuesday of Every Month to handle support operations for the Troop. The Committee oversees the needs of the troop and makes sure they are being meet. The Troop is the Scouts, your son. That is why we are here, to provide an excellent scouting program. The Scouts meet every Tuesday to conduct their program. Then there is the parents of the Troop. They are a very vital part of the Troop. Parents make up the Troop Committee, Scoutmaster, Asst. Scoutmasters, and are an excellent resource for the Troop. Not every parent holds a position, but all are asked to contribute in some way from time to time.

Troop 189 is a boy-run troop. Leadership is one of the methods of Scouting. Every boy will have an opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership. The meetings are planned and carried out by the patrol leaders' council. All duties for patrol activities are assigned by the patrol leader. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps the boy accept the leadership of others and helps him to grow into a more responsible adult. The troop organization chart on the following page outlines the complete organization of the troop. Refer to your son's scout handbook for more details about each specific position.

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Troop 189 Organization Chart

 

 

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CHAPTER III.

THE SCOUT UNIFORM

The scout uniform helps to achieve the objectives of scouting. Scouts in uniform are conscious of their rank and make a greater effort to advance. Only the uniform provides a place for display of badges - important symbols of achievement. Scouts in uniform, have more fun, stay longer, and feel a greater pride in their achievements. The uniform by itself can not make a good scout or a good troop, but its use has been proven to improve both the scout and the troop because it is a visible symbol of scouting and unity. Each scout is required to have and wear, within a reasonable amount of time after joining the troop, the scout uniforms.

The Troop uses two uniforms. The first is what we call class a uniform. This is a standard, official bsa regulation uniform that all scouts wear in the united states. The khaki dress shirt with green slacks or shorts. Specific information is available in the scout handbook, or you may talk to any adult leader of the troop. Scouts are asked to wear this uniform to all troop meetings from September first through march thirty-first. The second uniform is called the class b uniform. This uniform consist of the troop t-shirt with scout shorts. This uniform is the informal uniform the scouts may wear over the summer months or for appropriate occasions. The troop maintains a uniform exchange which is available to all scouts. This is done since young men out grow their clothing rapidly and the cost of new uniforms can be expensive. Parents are encourage to take part in this in order to save cost. The uniform is an important part of scouting, and is something a scout can take pride in wearing. Official placement of insignia may be found on the inside front and back cover of the scout handbook.

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CHAPTER IV.

ADVANCEMENT

First Class To Eagle Scout

Your son will begin the trail to Eagle. It will start with the completion of the Boy Scout Rank and continue until he leaves scouting. With the ranks of Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class he will learn basic, fundamental scouting skills. With the ranks of Star, Life and Eagle he will provide leadership for the troop, performing service projects, earning merit badges and using the skills learned while achieving the rank of First Class. These ranks are harder to obtain than the earlier ranks, but are also more interesting for the older scouts. Upon completion of all the requirements for Star and Life the Scout will be eligible to work for Eagle. The original principals, the Scout Oath and Law now have fuller meaning for the Scout and their understanding of them is much greater. The final steps towards Eagle are filled with leadership experiences.

Details for advancement are contained in the Boy Scout Handbook, which every Scout should obtain as soon as possible after joining the Troop. Take a look at Chapter 1. This short chapter has an advancement summary through First Class.

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Advancement Process

1. The Boy Scout learns. A Scout learns by doing. As he learns, he grows in ability to do his part as a member of the patrol and the troop. As he develops knowledge and skill, he is asked to teach others. In this way, he begins to develop leadership.

2. The Boy Scout is tested. A Scout may be tested on requirements by his patrol leader, Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmaster, a troop committee member or a member of his troop. The Scoutmaster maintains a list of those qualified to test and pass candidates..

3. The Boy Scout is reviewed. After a scout has completed all requirements for a rank, he has a board of review. For tenderfoot, second class, first class, star, life and eagle palms, the review is conducted by members of the troop committee. The eagle board of review is conducted by members of the district advancement committee.

4. The Boy Scout is recognized. When the board of review has certified a boy's advancement, he deserves to receive recognition as soon as possible. This should be done at a ceremony at the next troop meeting. The certificate for his next rank will be presented to him at the next troop court of honor.

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Merit Badges

The goal of the merit badge program is to expand a scout's areas of interest and to encourage the scout to meet and work with adults in a chosen subject. Merit badges are earned by a scout working with a registered merit badge counselor. The scout is required to contact the counselor to arrange for times and places to meet with the counselor. When the scout completes the work on the merit badge the counselor will inform the scoutmaster that the scout has completed the requirements for that badge. The troop does sponsor some merit badges but it is the scouts responsibility to complete them.

All parents of Troop 14 Scouts are encouraged to become Merit Badge Counselors. Please fill in the attached Troop Resource Survey and return to a Troop Leader.

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Board Of Review

When a scout has completed all the requirements for a rank, he appears before a board of review composed of members of the troop committee. The purpose of the review is not an examination. Rather it is to determine the scout's attitude and acceptance of scouting's ideals; to ensure that the requirements have been met for advancement, to discuss the scout's experiences in the troop and the Troop's program, and to encourage him to keep working towards advancement. A board of review may also be held to counsel a boy about his lack of progress toward advancement.

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Court Of Honor

Troop 189 holds a court of honor every four months. The court of honor recognizes all scout appointments, elections, awards, and advancements since the last court of honor. This is the time when the parents get to see their sons achievement. Courts of honor are a semi-formal occasion that truly adds meaning to the scouts achievements. It is very important that parents make a big effort to attend.

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CHAPTER V.

OUTDOOR PROGRAM

 

Scouting is effective whenever we take advantage of it's truth: The place where Scouting works best is also the place that boys want the most. The outdoors. There are a number of good reasons why the outdoor program is so special, here are the four that are especially good:

1. The outdoors is the best place for learning outdoor skills. How could it be otherwise? A Scout who tried to boil a potato on the gymnasium floor would be in hot water for sure - not to mention the boy who tried learning to swim by reading a book.

2. The outdoors is a great place for learning something about living with others. When Scouts walk on the same trail, cook and eat together, and share triumphs and troubles together, they are going to find out some important things about, say, patience, respect for other points of view, doing their full share, making a friend more easily, and saying no without losing one. Skills like these are among the "personal growth" skills we want from every Scout. The outdoors is where they grow up best.

3. On the trail or in camp, the boy's leaders will be challenged by the real thing - getting their patrols fed and sheltered, keeping them warm and safe, solving the problems they can solve, and knowing how to get help for those they can't. It's a time when leadership skills can deepen, patrols grow closer, and the troop grows stronger.

4. The outdoors is also a place where a Scout can get closer to the natural world around him - the land, the forests and their wildlife, the lakes and rivers, the mountains and the seas. Here, in the outdoors, he will learn of the "land ethic" - the understanding and respect for the environment we all share, and he will develop an active concern for it's health and a willingness to work to keep it healthy.

It is the goal of the Troop to have one Outdoor Program Activity every month. It may be a hike or a campout, or any other fun activity. In order for this to work it takes everyone contributing to the Troop program. if there is not an outdoor activity in the month there will be some type of activity during that month for the scouts to participate in. All efforts are made to meet this goal of the troop but it only comes true when everyone works together.

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CHAPTER VI.

YOUTH PROTECTION

Program Summary

Child abuse is a major problem affecting our society. Each year more than 2 million cases of suspected child abuse are reported. This means that 1 percent of American children are experiencing physical abuse, 1 percent are experiencing sexual abuse, and 2 to 5 percent are experiencing emotional maltreatment or some form of neglect. As a result of the significance of this social problem, The Boy Scouts of America has declared child abuse as one of the "unacceptable" to receive special attention by those involved in the Scouting program.

The BSA has developed a five-point plan to combat child abuse and to improve the environment in which young people live. The key elements of this strategy include the following points:

 

Educating Scouting volunteers, parents and Scouts themselves to aid in the detection and prevention of child abuse.

Establishing leader-selection procedures to prevent individuals with a history of child abuse from entering the BSA leadership ranks.

Establishing policies that minimize the opportunities for child abuse to occur in the program of the Boy Scouts of America.

Encouraging Scouts to report improper behavior in order to identify offenders quickly.

Swiftly removing and reporting alleged offenders.

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Parent Information

The Boy Scouts of America has developed materials for use in the Scouting program that provide essential information to members and their families. A detachable booklet in the front of The Boy Scout Handbook, "How to Protect Your Child from Child Abuse and Drug Abuse: A Parents Guide," provides information to help families to increase self-protection skills. Please take the time to complete this with your son.

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Troop Adults

Troop 189 has most of its adult leadership trained in Youth Protection. It is an on going process to keep adults trained on this problem so it can be combated effectively. If you would like to help, please contact the Committee Chairman.

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CHAPTER VII.

THE MONEY

Scout Expenses

1. Scout Dues & Registration

Many Troop charge a dues on the scout level to help fund the troop. Troop 189 has been very fortunate in recent fundraising success that currently there is not annual dues that goes to the troop. This will only continue as long as fund raising efforts are successful. BSA Membership Registration is $7.00 plus insurance and Boys Life which is optional.

 

2. Uniform--shirt, pants, socks, belt: $45-55.00

The Troop maintains a uniform exchange that you may participate in. There is a $5.00 charge for purchase of items, but there is no cost for exchanges.

Parents and Scouts are encouraged to participate in the uniform exchange because of the rapid growth that young men go threw. Buying a new Scout uniform every year can be expensive.

 

3. Summer Camp costs approx. $170.00. Each Scout will be encouraged to earn this money himself through participation in Troop fund raisers or his own enterprise.

 

4. Campout cost approx. $10 - $15 to cover the cost of food and any other expenses incurred.

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Troop Expenses

1. Troop Registration (annually)

2. Troop Insurance (annually)

3. Troop equipment (as needed).

4. Advancement pins, merit badges, etc.

5. Summer Camp fee for adult leaders.

6. Leadership Training Costs for selected Scouts and Adults from the Troop.

7. Activities

 

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Fund Raising

Troop 189 is blessed by the success of the Biannual Car Shows of Carlisle. The Troop parks cars for both the Spring and Fall Car Shows on lots of Nancy George at N. Pitt St and G St. This is a very lucrative fund raiser for the Troop and continued success is based upon parental support. From time to time the troop will also hold other fund raisers for a specific purpose. For example in the past a fund raiser was held just to purchase new tents. Scouting is not about fund raisers and therefore the majority of our time is not spent on fund raisers unless needed.

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Scout Accounts

Individual Scout's Fund moneys are Troop moneys designated for use by individual Scouts for summer camp, other campout fees, necessary scouting gear, or other expenses incurred from Scouting. Each Scout can earn money for in his scout account by participating in the Car Show fundraiser. Here is how it works:

Proceeds from Parking Cars - Expenses = Profit

Profit - George's Payment = Net Profit

Net Profit / 2 = Troop Operating Half & Scout Account Half

The Troop uses its half to fund the operation of the troop the other half of the funds are used for the Scout Accounts. Here is how it is broken into each individual scout account:

Total Hours worked including all parents and family / Scout Account Funds = Per Hour Rate That rate is then multiplied by the number of hours that each Scout and his family worked at the car show and that amount is then placed in his scout account.

It is possible to pay for most of summercamp by working one car show. This is done this way so everyone has the opportunity to participate in Boy Scouts regardless of cost.

 

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CHAPTER VIII.

INFORMATION AND FEEDBACK

Troop Newsletters

Troop 189 publishes Quarterly news letters to keep everyone informed of what is going on. We distribute them by electronic mail and the U.S. Postal service. You can choose which you would prefer.

 

Troop Website

Troop 189 maintains a web site at http://user.pa.net/~brickner/Scouts/Troop189.html. This is a great source for information and a place to get answers to your questions. Permission slips are posted to be printed and any other materials relevant to the Troop.

 

Parent Comments

If you have any comments, suggestions, or concerns please feel free to direct them to the Troop Leadership. Parents are encouraged to provide feedback so the Troop can continue to progress and become a better Troop. There many be a reason for the way something is, or your idea could be something no one has ever thought of, so please feel free to comment.

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CHAPTER IX.

CLOSING REMARKS

 

You are joining a great organization that includes tens of thousands of adult leaders, interested parents, and the BSA professional staff. Scouting is much more than enjoying the outdoors. Scouting teaches leadership skills and community skills. Scouting also shows the boys how they can keep themselves strong and healthy and make the most of life's challenges. With hard work and dedication, your son will be able to serve as a leader in the Troop and advance in rank along the trail to Eagle. This is the first that this booklet has been published so any comments or suggestion please feel free to pass them along. We would like to know if it helped, didn't help or what. We look forward to working with you and your son.

Above and beyond anything else said in this Parent Guide, the boys and us "big kids" are in Scouts to have fun!

 

Please take a moment to complete the information sheet on the following page. Thank-you.

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New Scout Parent Information Sheet

Scouting is a program for boys as well as adults. We would like to include as many of the scout parents in the troop programs as possible. Not only is it more fun that way, it is more effective for the scouts. In order to provide the best programs for the scouts it is necessary to find out some basic information about our adults so they may benefit from any talents or interest you may have. Your time and cooperation is greatly appreciated.

 

Parents, please complete the following and return it to _____________________________ as soon as possible.

 

Name: ______________________________ Home Phone: __________________

1. What is your favorite hobby? __________________________________________

Occupation ________________________________________________________

2. Are you interest in holding a troop leadership position at this time? Yes | No

If yes, what kind? ___________________________________________________

3. Please check the areas in which you would be willing to help:

___ Campouts

___ Hikes

___ Outdoor Activities

___ Troop Meetings

___ Bookkeeping

___ Newsletters

___ Transportation of Scouts

___ Swimming supervision

___ Transportation of equipment

___ I can participate in boards of review

___ I can help with troop equipment

___ Other: _______________________

 

 

4. Any other assistance or information:

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

 

5. I want to receive my newsletters by:

 

___ e-mail to: ___________________________________________________

___ Fax to: _______________________

___ Personal Delivery to: ______________________

___ Sent Home with Son['

___ Sent to My Home Address via U.S. Mail

___ Other: _______________________________

 

6. Do you have any scouting background? Yes | No

If yes what? _______________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

7. List any other information or comments you would like to share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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